Stretching boundaries …

... with haptic reinforced virtual reality-based manual dexterity modules: is it the future of oral health care education to support traditional simulations?

20 May, 2024 / infocus
 

Through the use of lifelike haptic reinforced virtual reality-based simulations and real-life handpiece tools, the latest VR-Haptic devices empower oral health care educators and transform health care education and, say experts in the field, among all of the industries developing VR-haptic solutions, oral healthcare could be one of the disciplines to experience the most beneficial effect.

VR-haptics represent a shift in oral health education, complementing traditional simulation learning methods with standardised, immersive, interactive experiences.

By incorporating VR and haptic technology, students become active participants in their education, engaging in lifelike simulations that enhance their learning experience in a relaxed VR-haptic scenario. This hands-on approach allows them to practice and refine their skills in a safe, controlled environment, preparing them for real- world clinical challenges.

Nevertheless, VR-Haptic reinforced simulations in oral health education are so far not regularly used to help students to learn in hyper-realistic, but risk-free, scenarios to operate and participate in procedures, especially in critical situations where an error could have devastating consequences.

Szabi Felszeghy, Secretary General of VR-Haptic Thinkers, said: “We are very pleased to welcome you this year to our hybrid, free-to-join 2024 VR-Haptic Thinkers Meetup to be held at University of Utah,  Health Sciences Education Building on 7 June. We would like to extend an invitation to each of you, who work in the dental education field in varied capacities, to attend our one-day free hybrid meetup.”

Tags: Haptics / VR

Categories: News

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